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Imaging Solutions for Direct To Garment Printing to Save Money and Improve Quality
Continued Save money, print White Ink with RIPPRO v06 for Epson SCF2000
This section covers the White Ink Controls. The white control can be run with automatic defaults and produce excellent results. The additional controls for white available with DTG RIPPRO v06 will help you turn your shirts into a form of art and reduce white ink costs. The RIP has numerous ways to adjust and fine tune the white layer. You can even make a Highlight White layer. There are three different white styles, the white style is chosen with the Media type. Changing the white amount under a color image affects color reproduction brightness. We will review how each of these styles can be fined tuned to obtain a higher level of quality based on the image being processed without printing extra unneeded white.
There are 21 media choices that represent 3 levels of saturation and
3 ways to create a white layer.
Below we use the Apple image with Media choices 10, 11, 12 for colored cotton, which are Extra saturation with 3 different whites styles.
 
Normal White
More White
Balanced White

Xtra Saturation eliminates the need to open an image in Photoshop and boost saturation by 40 to 42 percent.
We will show adjustments of the white image layer to explaining features of the White Controls.
This image is Not on a transparent background, There're two possible choices White under any colored pixel, since there are no pure whites, or underbase entire image which was chosen .
Density and Contrast sliders: Useful controls to modify all white image tone values. The normal button resets density and contrast back to zero.
VIgnette: Removes the color image if the white value is Zero(0) in that area.
Remove Darkest Shades of Vignette: Changes white values to zero below a threshold set by the slider. It increases the effect of the vignette
Add Highlight White: Clicking Create White Highlights generates a white layer for just pure whites. Eliminating the need to print two full whites to get solid white areas to appear like screen printing. There is a slider to reduce the amount of white in the highlight white.
Reduce Maximum White Only: Will not show a change here or in the preview screen. It affects the white ink output values where the most saturated colors are printed on top of white. Used if puddling happens under solid colors.
 Add White Under Black: Sets a fixed minimum amount of white to print under the darkest colors, only the darkest colors are affected
Explaining all of the buttons
Colored Cotton Extra Saturation, vignette black background, and show different white ink adjustments
This is Media 12 Colored Cotton Extra Saturation with Balanced White. Vignette settings are set to ON, Reduce Darkest Shades is minus 4 (-4), contrast slider is at minus 2 (-2). This is a very different white generation algorithm. See the extra white shades in the red and green apples. Tone reproduction is very good with the balanced white.
Compare white styles #10, #11, and #12
White Layer Normal
White shown as black
Color Layer after vignette chosen
Preview of
Color and White
scf2000_quickstart_2001016.jpg
Color Layer
Vignette is applied
These settings below took effect when "Create" is clicked to produce the white and color layers and the preview of white and color together. To make more changes modify settings, click "Create" again
White Layer above reversed
#10 Colored Cotton Xtra Saturated "White Normal" shown below

White Control Tab settings
Vignette color is turned ON
Remove Darkest Shades Set to 1%
White as white
#10 Colored Cotton Xtra Saturated "White Normal" Adjusted to reduce excess contrast shown below
The settings above produced too much contrast in the darkest shades of the apples.
So to correct for this, in the simplest way possible, we used the contrast slider to reduce the contrast in the white by minus 8. This is very simple to do using the preview image. You simple change the contrast slider, click "Create" and see the change
White Control Tab settings
Vignette color is turned ON
Remove Darkest Shades Set to 1%
Contrast Slider Reduce by minus 8 (-8)
#11 Colored Cotton Xtra Saturated "More White" Showing Final Adjustments shown below

White Control Tab settings
Vignette color is turned ON
Contrast Slider Reduce by minus 5 (-5)
# 10 White
#12 Colored Cotton Xtra Saturated with "Balanced White" Showing Final Adjustments shown below
White Control Tab settings
Vignette color is turned ON
Remove Darkest Shades Set to 4%
Contrast Slider Reduce by minus 2 (-2)
# 12 White
The size and print specifications are the same, the job included silhouetting the image and printing on a 14 x 16 colored Tshirt. Colored Cotton always uses more white ink than black cotton. The white layer was printed at 1440 x 1440, the color layer was printed at 1440 x 720. Only the white layers are shown to highlight differences. White and color ink costs are as follows.
DTG RIPPRO has lower ink costs than Garment Creator
How do you like them apples.
Epson Garment Creator
Ink Cost Color and White as reported by Epson $4.82
RIPPRO v06 #10 Color Cotton Normal White
Ink Cost Color and White $3.15
RIPPRO v06 #11 Color Cotton More White
Ink Cost Color and White $3.40
RIPPRO v06 #12 Color Cotton Balanced White
Ink Cost Color and White $2.60
White as black
scf2000_quickstart_2001006.gif
# 11 White
To Drop the black background we chose Vignette (color) and we had to increase Remove Darkest Shades to 1% to get rid of the black background. We then clicked "CREATE". We examined white, color and preview layers. These settings produce too much contrast in the darkest shades of the apples. See the preview, note almost no white in the dark shadows of the apples
This is Media 11 Colored Cotton Extra Saturation with More White. Vignette settings are set to ON, but Reduce Darkest Shades was not used, contrast is set to minus 5 (-5) helping this image. Style 11 needed little adjustment as More White lightened the shadows just enough. If you compare #10 Normal white with number #11 More White you see the differences in White.
35% less cost
47% less cost
 30% less cost